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We Can't Reach You, Hartford
An investigative history of the Hartford Circus Fire of July 6th, 1944. Nominated for a Fringe First at the 2006 Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
Daguerreotype
In the twilight of his life, famed photographer Matthew Brady must choose between the life he has built and the legacy he wants to leave behind.
Tone Clusters
Renowned prose author Joyce Carol Oates explores honesty, perspective, and denial through one couple's harrowing attempt to save the person they love
Tuesday, April 29, 2008
Young Americans
So, I know it's been a while since we've blogged. Perhaps you thought we were on hiatus? In fact, dear reader, its just the opposite. This has been four relentless months of theater-making thanks to our new friends at the Ontological (who have renamed our company The Young Americans and America! Fuck Yeah!, and probably other things behind our back). Our poor tired company members barely have time to sober up after the cast party before its time to tech the next chapter in our epic, fractured history of Charles Lindbergh. It's all winding to a close, and if there's anything that relentless theater-making denies you, its any sort of perspective. This is why, more and more, the May performance that once felt like some sort of end feels more and more like a work-in-progress showing. It will be a kind of throwing-lots-of-things-up-against-the-wall and seeing what sticks. More and more, I believe in the promise of this play, of this examination and cross-examination of one man's struggles with control (both mechanical and emotional). I think we'll have a few incarnations before we find the real skeleton of it, but with such an incredible cast, write, designers and brains (and pig hearts) behind this, I have no doubt we'll find it. And we'll rock your socks off. Just give us a few more months...

I have lots more to say about the process of creating the four individual parts vs. the whole, but it's bedtime, so I leave you with this, a quote that greatly inspires part 2:

[Lindbergh's] somewhat nervous "chatter, chatter" at breakfast allowed him to keep his mind off the one forbidden topic. "I daresay I shall get the whole tragic story one day in a flood of confidence," Nicolson reported to his wife.
posted by Jess @ 10:52 PM   4 comments
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